Solidarity with Black Communities

The Association of Professors of the University of Ottawa (APUO) expresses its solidarity with Black communities world-wide. The killing of George Floyd by Minneapolis police and the death of Regis Korchinski-Paquet following police intervention in Toronto have sparked outrage rooted in centuries of anti-black racism, colonialism, and police brutality. 
 
We call on our provincial and federal governments to recognize that the post-secondary education sector can provide greater opportunities for Black, Indigenous, and racialized people, and to make new investments in our universities and colleges that are specifically aimed at realizing this objective. A universally accessible post-secondary education system will improve the representation of Black, Indigenous, and racialized students, professors, librarians, support staff, and senior administrators in our institutions, enhance the educational experience of all, and set the stage for more robust research and innovation. The colonial foundation of our institutions combined with the constant rise of tuition fees prevents more Black, Indigenous, and racialized people from participating and enriching academia, and by extension the discourses in our public spheres.  
 
The APUO calls once again on the Central Administration of the University to implement the ten demands of the APUO Black, Indigenous, and people of colour (BIPOC) caucus listed in a June 16, 2019 letter. Almost a full year has gone by with very little progress being made on achieving these demands. To become a safer space for Black, Indigenous, and racialized students and workers, our University must acknowledge and address the systemic racism present on its campus, and implement the demands put forth by those who have been affected by this form of discrimination. 
 
By way of this statement, the APUO renews its commitment to tackling anti-Black racism and racism targeted towards Indigenous and racialized communities.